American band – Steveazarlive http://steveazarlive.com/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 21:23:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://steveazarlive.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png American band – Steveazarlive http://steveazarlive.com/ 32 32 How an American band inspired one of Jurassic Park’s best scenes https://steveazarlive.com/how-an-american-band-inspired-one-of-jurassic-parks-best-scenes/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 23:50:00 +0000 https://steveazarlive.com/how-an-american-band-inspired-one-of-jurassic-parks-best-scenes/ Steven Spielberg created an icon jurassic park moment while blasting music from a particular band through their car radio. The classic 1993 dinosaur disaster film features many memorable scenes. While some come directly from Michael Crichton’s original novel, others were developed specifically for the film. Michael Crichton conceived the basic idea of jurassic park in […]]]>

Steven Spielberg created an icon jurassic park moment while blasting music from a particular band through their car radio. The classic 1993 dinosaur disaster film features many memorable scenes. While some come directly from Michael Crichton’s original novel, others were developed specifically for the film.


Michael Crichton conceived the basic idea of jurassic park in 1983. In its original form, the story was about a pterosaur cloned from fossil DNA and had a graduate student as the main character. After years of work and negative feedback on early drafts, Crichton developed the theme park setting and decided to tell the story from a more mature point of view. Crichton’s books have inspired several science fiction films, and his earlier novel, Westworld, also used theme park decor. Spielberg bought the rights to the story before it was published, paying $1.5 million and an additional $500,000 for Crichton to craft a script. However, David Koepp was recruited to pen the final draft. In doing so, Koepp made substantial changes to the book’s characters and tone.

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Related: Watch Jurassic Park Spielberg’s Stop Motion Dinosaur Test Rejected

However, it was Spielberg who created the scene where the brutal approach of a T-rex causes ripples in a glass of water on a dashboard, and he was inspired by the sound of earth, wind and fire. Like him played their music in his car, the mirror started shaking to the beat. It fired Spielberg’s imagination, and he commissioned Oscar-winning special effects supervisor Michael Lantieri to bring it to life on screen. Lantieri, a key member of the dinosaur creation team, found that by attaching a guitar string to the dashboard of the Ford Explorer, he could create the right frequency to induce the ripple effect.


Was the Jurassic Park jeep scene in the book?

Books and screenplays are two different things, and to tell a novelist’s story, filmmakers often have to make adjustments. After all, a movie is a visual experience, whereas a novel can only expose the thoughts and feelings of its characters. jurassic park is no different, and inevitably there have been changes and additions to Crichton’s novel. As dinosaur attacks feature throughout the novel and the Tyrannosaurus escapes and launches an attack that leads Alan Grant and the children to get lost in the park, many aspects of the car attack scene are created for the film, including the rippling of the water and the famous moment when the children have only a thin sheet of plexiglass to protect themselves from the jaws of the T-rex.

Although there are many changes – for example, Dennis Nedry’s death is darker in the book – the film’s treatment is reasonably faithful to the novel. One of the stark differences is in tone, with the book having a darker, gorier feel. This is in keeping with the film’s decision to tone down the violence of Crichton’s original story. The characters also undergo changes: John Hammond, played by Richard Attenborough, is a likeable, if eccentric character in the film, while being a greedy and selfish lunatic in the book. Crichton described Hammond from the book as the dark side of Walt Disney, but Spielberg removed his antagonistic traits, saying that while Hammond was a brilliantly written villain, he was more interested in portraying the theme park owner as a cross between Walt Disney and Ross Perot. .

A film is a collaborative effort, and jurassic park blends the creativity of Chricton with that of Spielberg and its final screenwriter, Koepp. Additionally, a host of special effects and technology artists contributed to the film, making it one of the most memorable films of the 1990s. Inspiration can strike an artist at any time. For Spielberg and the rippling water scene, inspiration struck as the sound of earth, wind and fire filled his car. It’s no wonder box office receipts for the beloved jurassic park franchise have surpassed $6 billion worldwide.

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US band include Church of Shropshire on European tour https://steveazarlive.com/us-band-include-church-of-shropshire-on-european-tour/ Sun, 28 Aug 2022 05:05:11 +0000 https://steveazarlive.com/us-band-include-church-of-shropshire-on-european-tour/ THE Enablers will make their live debut in Shropshire next month. The band have a long association with the county, releasing records on the Bishop’s Castle-based Lancashire & Somerset label for over a decade, but this will be the first time they have played in Shropshire in their 20-year history. Initially formed in San Francisco […]]]>

THE Enablers will make their live debut in Shropshire next month.

The band have a long association with the county, releasing records on the Bishop’s Castle-based Lancashire & Somerset label for over a decade, but this will be the first time they have played in Shropshire in their 20-year history.

Initially formed in San Francisco in 2002, the group is now shared between New York, California and France.

They have reunited to make a new album ‘Some Gift’ and embark on a 40-date European tour at the end of next week and will perform at the historic Myndtown Church on Monday September 5 at 7.30pm.

Support comes from the Haress of Bishop’s Castle.

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Haress channels traditional folk music through eerie atmospheric filters giving new life to familiar sounds. Their own album “Ghosts” was released earlier in 2022 to critical acclaim:

A review in The Quietus said, “It’s an appropriate image given that Ghosts was recorded in a disused watermill. This blissful psychedelia isn’t quite pastoral – there’s nothing twee about these unfolding grooves – but evokes water and wood, light and shadow, a forgotten workplace. and the absent human form with seductive grace.

Tickets are limited

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Steven Van Zandt names the most important American band in history https://steveazarlive.com/steven-van-zandt-names-the-most-important-american-band-in-history/ Sun, 07 Aug 2022 00:51:56 +0000 https://steveazarlive.com/steven-van-zandt-names-the-most-important-american-band-in-history/ E Street Band’s Steven Van Zandt recently posted a tweet to express his love for The Byrds, evoking their great importance in the history of music as an American group. Steven Van Zandt enjoys spending his free time on social media when he’s not busy working on music. Primarily on his Twitter, Van Zandt interacts […]]]>

E Street Band’s Steven Van Zandt recently posted a tweet to express his love for The Byrds, evoking their great importance in the history of music as an American group.

Steven Van Zandt enjoys spending his free time on social media when he’s not busy working on music. Primarily on his Twitter, Van Zandt interacts with his fans, alerting them to the political state of America, and sharing thoughts with them about other artists and the music scene in general.

In a recent tweet, Steven Van Zandt made a list of the best american bands in the history of music after receiving a tweet about the Byrds. Van Zand included bands like the Byrds in this list. However, after receiving negative comments on his list, Van Zandt deleted this tweet. The guitarist then clarified that it was a list of American bands, not American bands.

One of his fans replied to his tweet saying that the band was great, but it was the band of Robbie, a Canadian musician. Also, referring to Van Zandt’s statement that it was an American list, he sarcastically said that Van Zandt would have made a great lawyer with this “loophole”. After these reactions, the guitarist decided to delete the tweet.

Seeing this, another fan of his told Van Zandt not to let Twitter win because it’s his roster and picks. However, Van Zandt argued that it was his fault as he should have just talked about the Byrds rather than making a list. He then said that the Byrds are America’s largest band in history, not to mention the Jimi Hendrix Experience.

After seeing Steven Van Zandt’s list, one of his fans tweeted the following:

“Come on man, Levon was great, but that was Robbie’s band. But yes, while having fun. I like the “American” loophole, ha. You probably would have made a great lawyer if all that Rock ‘n’ Roll stuff hadn’t worked. What about your friend Nils’ time with Crazy Horse? »

After that, Van Zandt said:

“There are too many to manage; I delete it. And yes, Robbie was the lead author, but it wasn’t Robbie’s band (he’s a friend), and he’d be the first to tell you, and does in his book, that Levon provided the essential identity of the group. His life, his story, his voice.

Another of his fans then tweeted:

“I don’t think you should delete your list. It’s your list, your choice, and it’s America! Don’t let Twitter win.

Van Zandt replied:

“No, it was my fault. He just asked about the Byrds; I should have stuck with that. If we don’t count the Jimi Hendrix experience, for me, the Byrds are America’s largest band in history. Right ahead of the Beach Boys because they showed the potential scope of the new art form.

You can check out the tweets below.

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Mark Farner’s American group rocks the Libbey Bowl on August 6 | Culture https://steveazarlive.com/mark-farners-american-group-rocks-the-libbey-bowl-on-august-6-culture/ Fri, 05 Aug 2022 06:55:26 +0000 https://steveazarlive.com/mark-farners-american-group-rocks-the-libbey-bowl-on-august-6-culture/ Country the United States of AmericaUS Virgin IslandsU.S. Minor Outlying IslandsCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth ofCuba, Republic ofDominican RepublicHaiti, Republic ofJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist Republic ofAlgeria, People’s Democratic Republic ofAmerican SamoaAndorra, Principality ofAngola, Republic ofAnguillaAntarctica (the territory south of 60 degrees S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, Republic ofAzerbaijan, Republic ofBahrain, Kingdom ofBangladesh, People’s Republic […]]]>

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Brulé, a Native American band based in Sioux Falls, the show draws thousands to Levitt at the Falls https://steveazarlive.com/brule-a-native-american-band-based-in-sioux-falls-the-show-draws-thousands-to-levitt-at-the-falls/ Sun, 31 Jul 2022 13:52:46 +0000 https://steveazarlive.com/brule-a-native-american-band-based-in-sioux-falls-the-show-draws-thousands-to-levitt-at-the-falls/ SIOUX FALLS, SD (KELO) — Levitt at the Falls was sold out Saturday night for the group Brulé’s return to Sioux Falls. Nancy Halverson, executive director of Levitt at the Falls, says the summer lineup promises to attract thousands more people. “So far this year we’ve had about 50,000 people on the pitch,” Halverson said. […]]]>

SIOUX FALLS, SD (KELO) — Levitt at the Falls was sold out Saturday night for the group Brulé’s return to Sioux Falls.

Nancy Halverson, executive director of Levitt at the Falls, says the summer lineup promises to attract thousands more people.

“So far this year we’ve had about 50,000 people on the pitch,” Halverson said. “We have about 24 shows left, and I expect we’ll have close to 80-100,000 people by the end of the season.”

Brulé is a contemporary Native American band based in Sioux Falls. Their show mixes Native American culture, dance and education.

“It’s always an honor to gain and receive recognition from your hometown audience, we’ll never tire of it and we always appreciate it, and we’re always honored by it,” said pianist Paul LaRoche.

Halverson says Brule’s 2019 concert drew around 8,000 people; she was planning, even more so, to come for this year’s show. Some attendees started asking for a spot as early as noon.

“We live a few blocks away, so we wanted to get down and get our seats so we could be sure we got a spot,” said attendee Tara Johnson.

“It’s awesome, they’re just great people,” said contestant Lisa Lincoln.

“They have wonderful music, wonderful people, so it’s more fun to come and see something like that,” said Lori Withy, attendee.

Halverson estimates that nine to ten thousand people attended.

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Mark Farner’s American band at the Canyon on August 5 https://steveazarlive.com/mark-farners-american-band-at-the-canyon-on-august-5/ Thu, 28 Jul 2022 19:43:47 +0000 https://steveazarlive.com/mark-farners-american-band-at-the-canyon-on-august-5/ It was around 3 o’clock in the morning. Mark Farner woke from a deep sleep with words crossing his mind in a dream. He knew that if he waited until morning to take a note, what he thought would be gone. And so, still between sleeping and waking – what Farner called “between heaven and […]]]>

It was around 3 o’clock in the morning. Mark Farner woke from a deep sleep with words crossing his mind in a dream. He knew that if he waited until morning to take a note, what he thought would be gone.

And so, still between sleeping and waking – what Farner called “between heaven and earth” – he turned on a dim red light he had on his bedside table, grabbed a nearby Steno notebook, pulled out the pen from inside the metal spiral that held the notebook together, and he wrote the words – the exact lyrics – he would make famous in the 1970 song he recorded with Grand Funk Railroad called “I’m YourCaptain”.

Fans may well hear that song and certainly more during “Mark Farner’s American Band Acoustic Show,” scheduled for 8 p.m. Friday, August 5, at the Canyon on Valencia Boulevard in Santa Clarita.

“A lot of the songs we hear on the radio start on acoustic guitars,” Farner, now 73, told The Signal in a recent interview he gave by phone from his home in Michigan. “They just end up with electric guitars. Because it’s much more convenient to get your acoustic guitar out of the kitchen while you’re sitting down having a coffee than it is to go for a run and plug in your amp cord and pick up your electric guitar. You know, if you think of something, you can access it immediately, like I did for “I’m Your Captain”.

After writing the lyrics to the song in the middle of the night, which took him about 10 minutes – entirely in that state between sleep and awake – Farner said he got up the next day, went in his kitchen, had poured his morning cup of coffee, then he picked up his acoustic guitar and, while tuning it, made a discovery.

“I start playing, buh-bap, buh-bap, buh-doo-doo-doo-doo, and I played this little ditty that starts the song,” Farner continued. “And I went, ‘That’s pretty cool.’ And then I grabbed this chord, this inversion of a C chord that I’d never done before. And it was like, ‘Wow, what’s that?’ And I looked at my fingers and I was like, “Wow, I have to memorize that,” because that really spoke to me.

Farner said the harmonics coming out of the strings created a sound unlike anything he had ever heard.

“So as I think about it, bang, it comes to mind, ‘Go get those words in the other room. It could be a song,” Farner recalled, lighting up and looking like the late radio personality Jean Shepherd as he recalled fond childhood memories. “And so, I think, ‘Oh, those words. Yeah.’ I’ll catch them. And I have my tape recorder on the table next to my coffee. I put the words there, and I hit the record, and I just started playing.

He said the song came from him.

“I recorded it,” Farner continued, “even with the chorus in there and the breakdown and the bridge where it breaks out — it all came to me as a stream.”

Farner, one of the three founding members of Grand Funk Railroad – a prominent rock band in the 1970s known for their arena rock style – took the song to rehearsal later that day. He said his fellow band members heard him and told him the song would be a hit.

And it was.

Other popular Grand Funk Railroad songs include “We’re an American Band“, a cover of “The Loco-Motion”, and “Some Kind of Wonderful”.

It’s Mark Farner’s American band, however, that will take the stage at the Canyon on August 5th. Farner said he will be joined by two other performers – there will be an acoustic guitar, an acoustic bass and some keyboards. Together, he said, they plan to share a message of love.

“I’m a loving person,” Farner added. “That’s what drives me – the love and the potential we have with music to spread that love and ignite it and encourage others and water that seed that’s been planted in them. And because, really, love is what we are made of. If we can go back to the point where we were the baby in somebody’s arms, and we were that little bundle of energy, that’s what love is.

That perspective, Farner said, was reinforced about 10 years ago by a near-death experience. He said he actually died twice before doctors implanted an internal pacemaker in his chest.

“I had a bundle branch block that prevented my lower ventricle from – I mean, it just didn’t get the signal,” Farner said.

One morning in October 2012, he and his wife were in Detroit on business, and his wife, who had already risen from a night’s sleep, was coming out of the bathroom when she saw one of the arms of her husband getting up in the air as he lay there in bed. Then one of his legs went up in the air, Farner recalls. His wife told him he looked as white as a ghost and she called 9-1-1.

Later in the hospital, while trying to get his heart to work, Farner said doctors gave him so much electricity that he actually stopped twice.

“And when I died,” he recalls, “I was immediately in heaven. I mean, it was like I knew everything. I had even understood what the purpose of the earth years was. I knew him in this state of being. But on this side, I think it was probably too much information. It would be like plugging a 110 fan into 220 – it would just smoke that sucker.

In other words, when Farner came out of this state of being, the knowledge of what he had been through was gone, as were those dreams he didn’t jot down in his Steno notebook in the middle of the night. . But he probably understood the fragility of life.

“We’re not here forever,” Farner said. “We are here for a short time and then we go back to where we came from.”

Farner raised the 28-year-old son he lost in 2008, which made him still appreciate what we have here on Earth.

“He broke his neck knocking over a picnic table,” Farner said. “Too many beers, camping with his buddies…Poor baby. He has just arrived in the prime of life.

Farner and his wife cared for him in their home for some time before he finally died. Farner would often play songs for their boy towards the end.

“He liked to hear me play,” he said. “And so, I would just – whenever he asked – come in and jam him and cheer him up.”

It’s that transfer of love that Farner was talking about earlier that he tries to offer his fans when he plays music. He is especially considerate of fans who are military veterans and government officials. Farner’s father, who was a veteran and later a firefighter, and his mother, who was a welder in World War II, taught him the importance of service.

“Those who serve us in the service know and recognize my songs and my attitude and who I am,” Farner said. “The proof is in the pudding. What I’ve done for them over the years comes straight from my heart.

To learn more about Farner and Mark Farner’s American Band, or to purchase tickets for the show at the Canyon, go to WhereMusicMeetsTheSoul.com and search for the location of Santa Clarita and Farner’s August 5 event. Or head to the Farner website for other shows in the area at MarkFarner.com.

Mark Farner of Mark Farner’s American Band is set to perform August 5 at the Canyon in Santa Clarita. Photo courtesy of Mark Farner

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Native American band brings culture to Montana Folk Festival https://steveazarlive.com/native-american-band-brings-culture-to-montana-folk-festival/ Sun, 10 Jul 2022 15:04:00 +0000 https://steveazarlive.com/native-american-band-brings-culture-to-montana-folk-festival/ BUTTE – The folk festival ends in Butte on Sunday and music from a wide range of genres is represented. One group that is getting a lot of attention is the Native American music of the Assiniboine Cree. “We have always been a family group since we were knee high. Our late father, he gave […]]]>

BUTTE – The folk festival ends in Butte on Sunday and music from a wide range of genres is represented. One group that is getting a lot of attention is the Native American music of the Assiniboine Cree.

“We have always been a family group since we were knee high. Our late father, he gave us this path. For us, Aboriginal songs are really important,” said Jason Belcourt of the Assiniboine Cree Singers.

Hailing from the Fort Belknap and Rocky Boy reserves, the Assiniboine Cree are a family group that is in its fifth generation of preserving the musical heritage of its tribe.

For Jason and his family, music is more than an art. It is sacred.

“It’s almost like a key that opens during a ceremony, a prayer and even a social dance. This way of life this music has always been instilled in us since we were little. We have always been a large family group consisting of our late father Charlie, his brothers and their children, and then us. Even now we have grandchildren, great-grandchildren, taking over this family group,” Belcourt said.

For the Assiniboine Cree, there is a song and a chant for just about every occasion.

“So whether you’re praying or sweating or ceremonial or a lot of people in the local culture just singing a love song to your wife, it opens doors for you,” he said. .

Luke Shelton – MTN NEWS

Hailing from the Fort Belknap and Rocky Boy reserves, the Assiniboine Cree are a family group that is in its fifth generation of preserving the musical heritage of its tribe.

The song the Assiniboine Cree performed with booming drums and soaring vocals was the music that would be performed at a tribal social gathering.

“I’m too young to talk about the ceremonial side so we chose to come here and share our social dance. The social dances we know today as powwows. There are already powwows. It’s relatively new to us, probably about 100 years old, this powwow way of life,” Belcourt said.

Over the weekend, this group hopes to introduce the crowd to many forms of Native American music.

“We hope to feature some of these tribal dances, tribal dances, dressy jingle dances, sneak-ups, various forms of dance. We hope to get the crowd involved as well and maybe do a round dance or two,” Belcourt said.

This is the Assiniboine Cree’s first trip to the Montana Folk Festival and it is shaping up to be a memorable experience.

“We’re very excited to be here,” Belcourt said. “It’s amazing. There’s a lot of electric feeling here. There’s a good vibe here.


IN FASHION NOW


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Native American group brings culture to Montana Folk Festival https://steveazarlive.com/native-american-group-brings-culture-to-montana-folk-festival/ Sun, 10 Jul 2022 14:54:35 +0000 https://steveazarlive.com/native-american-group-brings-culture-to-montana-folk-festival/ BUTTE – The folk festival ends on Sunday, here in Butte, and music from a wide range of genres is represented. And one group that’s getting a lot of attention is the Native American music of the Assiniboine Cree. “We have always been a family group since we were knee high. Our late father, he […]]]>

BUTTE – The folk festival ends on Sunday, here in Butte, and music from a wide range of genres is represented.

And one group that’s getting a lot of attention is the Native American music of the Assiniboine Cree.

“We have always been a family group since we were knee high. Our late father, he gave us this path. For us, Aboriginal songs are really important,” said Jason Belcourt of the Assiniboine Cree Singers.

Hailing from the Fort Belknap and Rocky Boy reserves, the Assiniboine Cree are a family group that is in its fifth generation of preserving the musical heritage of its tribe.

For Jason and his family, music is more than an art. It is sacred.

Luke Shelton – MTN NEWS

Hailing from the Fort Belknap and Rocky Boy reserves, the Assiniboine Cree are a family group that is in its fifth generation of preserving the musical heritage of its tribe.

“It’s almost like a key that opens during a ceremony, a prayer and even a social dance. This way of life this music has always been instilled in us since we were little. We have always been a large family group consisting of our late father Charlie, his brothers and their children, and then us. Even now we have grandchildren, great-grandchildren, taking over this family group,” Belcourt said.

For the Assiniboine Cree, there is a song and a chant for just about every occasion.

“So whether you’re praying or sweating or ceremonial or even just singing a love song to your wife, it opens doors for you,” he said.

The song the Assiniboine Cree performed with booming drums and soaring vocals was the music that would be performed at a tribal social gathering.

“I’m too young to talk about the ceremonial side so we chose to come here and share our social dance. The social dances we know today as powwows. There are already powwows. It’s relatively new to us, probably about 100 years old, this powwow way of life,” Belcourt said.

Over the weekend, this group hopes to introduce the crowd to many forms of Native American music.

“We hope to feature some of these tribal dances, tribal dances, dressy jingle dances, sneak-ups, various dance forms. We also hope to involve the crowd and maybe do a round dance or two,” Belcourt said.

This is the Assiniboine Cree’s first trip to the Montana Folk Festival and it is shaping up to be a memorable experience.

“We’re very excited to be here,” Belcourt said. “It’s amazing. There’s a lot of electric feeling here. There’s a good vibe here.

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American Band College Dedicates New Facility to Ashland – Medford News, Weather, Sports, Breaking News https://steveazarlive.com/american-band-college-dedicates-new-facility-to-ashland-medford-news-weather-sports-breaking-news/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 19:00:00 +0000 https://steveazarlive.com/american-band-college-dedicates-new-facility-to-ashland-medford-news-weather-sports-breaking-news/ Scott McKee, Founder and Executive Director of American Band College, assists Gladys Wright Tuesday during the grand opening of the new American Band College Al and Gladys Wright Center in Ashland. [Jamie Lusch / Mail Tribune] An Indiana woman and her husband will long be associated with the town of Ashland through their service and […]]]>

Scott McKee, Founder and Executive Director of American Band College, assists Gladys Wright Tuesday during the grand opening of the new American Band College Al and Gladys Wright Center in Ashland. [Jamie Lusch / Mail Tribune]

An Indiana woman and her husband will long be associated with the town of Ashland through their service and generosity to the American Band College.

A ceremony Tuesday morning dedicated the new Al and Gladys Wright Center of American Band College in a former church building at 748 Siskiyou Blvd., at the corner of Siskiyou and Liberty Street.

During the ceremony, 97-year-old Gladys Wright and about 175 people involved with this year’s ABC summer program formed a six-line shovel brigade. Everyone took turns digging a shovel full of dirt where a new access road will be built, leading around the building to a loading dock area.

The building, originally the Hillside Church, is believed to have been built in the 1950s. It is currently undergoing extensive renovations which are expected to be completed before the end of the year. It will serve as a research center and storage location for ABC’s massive collection of more than 50,000 band music tracks.

The 6,000 square foot building was purchased in part with proceeds from the sale of a house in Lebanon, donated to ABC by Gladys Wright.

The Oregon native attended Wasco High School. She tells the story of how her high school band played in band contests every year, but was beaten by the Arlington band, which had a very good trumpeter named Doc Severinsen.

Gladys Wright taught at schools in Elmira just outside Eugene after graduating from the University of Oregon. She met her future husband, Al Wright, at the then famous Gunnison Music Camp in Colorado.

Since 1953, Gladys Wright has lived in West Lafayette, Indiana, where she taught music at area high schools. Her husband, who died two years ago at the age of 104, was a renowned clinician and group director at Purdue University for many years.

Al and Gladys Wright were both clinicians at the very first American Band College in 1989. They returned as clinicians in 2005, 2008 and 2011.

Together they created several important band organizations: the John Philip Sousa Foundation, the National Band Association, the McDonald’s Band, and Women Band Directors International.

“They are two of the most important figures in our company,” said Max McKee, founder and chief executive of ABC. “The center is named after them to honor their legacy.”

Gladys Wright conducted Sousa’s “Stars and Stripes Forever” to close out ABC’s June 26 concert at the Craterian Theatre. ABC’s second concert will be July 4 at 7:30 a.m. at Ashland High School’s football stadium.

From 2016 through May of this year, ABC stored its collection of music and other records in library space inside Lincoln School at Ashland. Prior to that, the records were held at Southern Oregon University, where McKee served as a professor of music for 30 years.

The collection has grown considerably over the years, with much of it donated by publishers around the world. Music is used in sight-reading clinics, and students perform the pieces as part of their classes in the master’s program.

The new facility will ease ABC’s growing pains.

“We’ll be using our high-density storage system in the new center,” Max McKee said, “which will leave room for prep work to put together music files for the big bands we have in Ashland every summer and Seattle every November for the West International Music Clinic.

The new center will be reserved for storage and administrative work, without rehearsal spaces. Summer clinics and rehearsals are held at Ashland High School.

“We use the school’s Mountain Avenue Theater for four lectures each day of our summer program,” McKee said.

ABC also uses the theater and music room for rehearsals, rents the school’s kitchen facilities to cook lunches for nearly 200 people a day, and conducts entrance exams and final written exams at other school rooms.

For more information on ABC, visit bandworld.org/abc/.

Contact Ashland writer Jim Flint at jimflint.ashland@yahoo.com.

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White Lady, the next creation of the American group Working Class Hussys, is full of positive vibes https://steveazarlive.com/white-lady-the-next-creation-of-the-american-group-working-class-hussys-is-full-of-positive-vibes/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 13:43:19 +0000 https://steveazarlive.com/white-lady-the-next-creation-of-the-american-group-working-class-hussys-is-full-of-positive-vibes/ Author: Jennifer Stone June 24, 2022 June 24, 2022 June 24, 2022June 25, 2022 Prominent heavy hook rock band Working Class Hussys present a powerful rhythm saga through their upcoming composition, “White Lady”, which will be released on July 1st. Big Fang American Rock Band working class hussys is about to release another amazing new […]]]>

Author: Jennifer Stone