American songwriters – Steveazarlive http://steveazarlive.com/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 11:05:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://steveazarlive.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png American songwriters – Steveazarlive http://steveazarlive.com/ 32 32 Reflection on “American Pie” by Don McLean on the occasion of his 50th birthday https://steveazarlive.com/reflection-on-american-pie-by-don-mclean-on-the-occasion-of-his-50th-birthday/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 11:00:59 +0000 https://steveazarlive.com/reflection-on-american-pie-by-don-mclean-on-the-occasion-of-his-50th-birthday/ She is celebrating her 50th birthday today. Miss American Pie, of course. And on this date, we mark the golden anniversary when the pop song “American Pie” hit the music charts on November 27, 1971, ranking No. 69 on the Billboard charts. On January 15, the epic song written and sung by Don McLean began […]]]>


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The creators of these companies are all from Michigan. https://steveazarlive.com/the-creators-of-these-companies-are-all-from-michigan/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 21:09:32 +0000 https://steveazarlive.com/the-creators-of-these-companies-are-all-from-michigan/ Michiganders should never be taken with a grain of salt. We are becoming big names in the industry. I mean, come on. We have Tim Allen and of course dreamer Mathew Lillard in our corner. But, we are not talking about famous actors here. These chosen people did not get their names while playing. These […]]]>

Michiganders should never be taken with a grain of salt. We are becoming big names in the industry. I mean, come on. We have Tim Allen and of course dreamer Mathew Lillard in our corner.

But, we are not talking about famous actors here. These chosen people did not get their names while playing.

These gentlemen made an impression in the world and probably helped transform your childhood.

The CEOs and founders of these companies are from Michigan

I mean, does that surprise you? The people of Michigan are not to be taken lightly. Take a look at these Michiganders who made things you probably use every day.

I don’t know about you, but Guitar Hero was a big part of my childhood. I’m a Gen Z baby so you can only imagine some of the times I’ve had with the game.

It’s crazy to know that the guy who helped design the game is from Battle Creek.

Craigslist, Twitter, Google … I mean you probably don’t use Craigslist every day, but you can use Google and Twitter, and two guys who helped start the business are from the state of Michigan. .

Did we miss someone you know?

56 of Michigan’s most famous people

Actors and actresses, sports legends, musicians and more make up Michigan celebrities

.

Michigan City Nicknames

Michigan has 12 state symbols – how many of them can you name?

Michigan has 12 state symbols – how many of them can you name?

WATCH: Michigan’s Most Famous Historic Homes

There are quite a few historic homes in Michigan, even in the smallest of cities. Many of these homes are well over 100 years old, and many are still private homes with families growing up within the historic walls.


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Kara DioGuardi Net Worth (2021 Update) https://steveazarlive.com/kara-dioguardi-net-worth-2021-update/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 00:36:07 +0000 https://steveazarlive.com/kara-dioguardi-net-worth-2021-update/ What is Kara DioGuardi’s net worth? Net value : $ 25 million Age: 50 Born: December 9, 1970 Native country: united states of america Wealth source: Songwriter Last update: 2021 introduction Kara DioGuardi is an American songwriter, record producer and singer. DioGuardi writes music mainly in the pop-rock genre. She has worked with several popular […]]]>

What is Kara DioGuardi’s net worth?

Net value : $ 25 million
Age: 50
Born: December 9, 1970
Native country: united states of america
Wealth source: Songwriter
Last update: 2021

introduction

Kara DioGuardi is an American songwriter, record producer and singer.

DioGuardi writes music mainly in the pop-rock genre. She has worked with several popular artists. His songs seem to exceed 160 million worldwide. DioGuardi is a Grammy and Emmy nominated writer.

She is the recipient of the 2011 NAMM Music For Life Award and also the recipient of the NMPA Songwriter Icon Award. She received 20 BMI Awards for her co-writing.

In 2021, Kara DioGuardi’s net worth is estimated to be around $ 25 million.

Early life

Kara Elizabeth DioGuardi was born on December 9, 1970 in New York City.

Her father is a former Republican Congressman and 2010 US Senate candidate Joe DioGuardi.

She grew up in the Wilmot Woods section of New York. She attended elementary school at Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic School in Scarsdale. After graduating, she worked for Billboard magazine as an assistant to Timothy White and Howard Lander.

Career

DioGuardi was the judge for the 8th and 9th seasons of American Idol. She was introduced to the music industry shortly after college with an advertising sales job for Billboard magazine.

As a songwriter, she has worked with artists such as Kylie Minogue, Lindsay Lohan, Jessica Simpson, Santana, Celine Dion, Britney Spears and American Idol alumni Adam Lambert, Kelly Clarkson, David Archuleta and Clay Aiken .

She co-founded Arthouse Entertainment, a music production and publishing company that has released hits from many successful artists.

In 2009, she wrote “If I Can’t Have You” for Meat Loaf’s album, “Hang Cool Teddy Bear”. She recorded the voice in duet with Meat Loaf. She is also one of the screenwriters for “Ghost”, which was released as a single from Fefe Dobson’s “Joy” album in 2010.

Some of these hits include “Come Clean” by Hilary Duff, “What’s Left of Me” by Nick Lachey and the Grammy-nominated single “Rich Girl” by Gwen Stefani.

Her songs have been heard in numerous movies, commercials and televisions, including “Glee”, “Hannah Montana”, “Get Smart” and “Smallville”. Today, DioGuardi won eleven BMI Awards.

In 2021, Kara DioGuardi’s net worth is estimated to be around $ 25 million.

Strong points

Here are some of the best highlights of Kara DioGuardi’s career:

  • We Rock (Song, 2008)
  • Vice President of Talent Development at Warner Bros (2008)
  • American Idol (TV show, 2009 – 2010)
  • The Ears of God (song, 2011)

Favorite quotes from Kara DioGuardi

“What’s tricky is sometimes the best vocals – just because someone hits the big notes and sounds amazing – that doesn’t necessarily mean they’re making the greatest artists. “ – Kara DioGuardi

“I don’t think people really understood what I did. You know, in my book, ‘A Helluva High Note’ deals with my story, that I was a songwriter, that I spent years trying to perfect my craft and being rejected to eventually become a songwriter- successful composer, record manager and publisher. . “ – Kara DioGuardi

“Bruno Mars is an excellent example of a great voice and a classic composition with a touch that makes it contemporary. I think he did a great job. I think Katy Perry has some undeniable songs for what she does, for this pop market. And, if we’re talking about the real pop market, I’d say these two. ” – Kara DioGuardi

“In my life, I’ve never bought a big jewel – like, ‘I’m going to buy myself a big jewel!’ The life of songwriters is unstable and from top to bottom. – Kara DioGuardi

“It takes a lot of skill to pull off a hit song – early in your career you’re usually more of inspiration than skill, and you become great when those intersect. A skilled songwriter can get you to this intersection. – Kara DioGuardi

“I discovered the world of music over the years,” she says. “I came to understand how pretty much everything worked, but the biggest lesson was on the business side. “ – Kara DioGuardi

3 awesome lessons from Kara DioGuardi

Now that you know all about Kara DioGuradi’s net worth and how she got it; let’s take a look at some of the lessons we can learn from it:

1. Take action

When we stop opposing reality, the action becomes simple, fluid, kind, and fearless.

2. Happiness

Happiness is neither in possessions nor in gold.

3. Struggles

If there is no struggle, there is no progress.

Summary

Kara DioGuardi is an American composer, producer and television host.

DioGuardi has recorded over 250 of his songs and released them on studio albums. DioGuardi is a music producer and publisher and is the current Executive Vice President of Talent Development at Warner Bros Records.

She spoke alongside Ryan Seacrest and fellow judges Randy Jackson, Ellen DeGeneres and Simon Cowell in the “Judge Me Tender” finale.

In 2021, Kara DioGuardi’s net worth is estimated to be around $ 25 million.

What do you think of Kara DioGuardi’s net worth? Leave a comment below.


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Entertainment News Roundup: “It’s gonna be scary but… fun” – Cardi B on hosting the American Music Awards; “Rust” script never called for the firing of the Baldwin pistol, allegation of prosecution and more https://steveazarlive.com/entertainment-news-roundup-its-gonna-be-scary-but-fun-cardi-b-on-hosting-the-american-music-awards-rust-script-never-called-for-the-firing-of-the-baldwin-pistol-all/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 04:56:51 +0000 https://steveazarlive.com/entertainment-news-roundup-its-gonna-be-scary-but-fun-cardi-b-on-hosting-the-american-music-awards-rust-script-never-called-for-the-firing-of-the-baldwin-pistol-all/ Here is a summary of the current entertainment briefs. “It’s gonna be scary but… fun” – Cardi B on hosting the American Music Awards Rapper Cardi B said she was scared but excited to host for her first time when she chairs the American Music Awards on Sunday. The New York native said she knew […]]]>

Here is a summary of the current entertainment briefs.

“It’s gonna be scary but… fun” – Cardi B on hosting the American Music Awards

Rapper Cardi B said she was scared but excited to host for her first time when she chairs the American Music Awards on Sunday. The New York native said she knew the job would be a lot of work, but said she wanted to tick it off her bucket list.

‘Rust’ script never called for Baldwin pistol to be fired, lawsuit says

A member of the crew working on the western “Rust” said in a lawsuit Wednesday that the script never called for shooting a gun during a scene Alec Baldwin was rehearsing when he killed a director of photography last month. Script supervisor, Mamie Mitchell, alleges that Baldwin should have checked the firearm himself for live ammunition rather than relying on the assistant director’s claim that the Colt .45 revolver was safe at use.

Helen Mirren to receive SAG Lifetime Honor

Britain’s Helen Mirren will receive a Lifetime Achievement Award from her fellow actors at the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) awards ceremony next year, organizers said on Thursday. Oscar winner Mirren has played more than 70 roles ranging from Queen Elizabeth to a Secret Service assassin during her 45-year career in film, television and theater.

Bursting with bling, ‘House of Gucci’ recounts the feuds behind fashion

Bold, beautiful to look at and bursting with star power, “House of Gucci” brings to the big screen the remarkable story of the feuding family behind the Italian fashion label. Starring Lady Gaga as an ambitious stranger who has married into the family to see her spouse killed, the film, which releases next Thursday in the United States and beyond, tells a tale of decadence, betrayal and of revenge.

Briton pleads guilty in New York to global film piracy program

A Briton pleaded guilty on Thursday to involvement in an alleged global hacking network that distributed unreleased movies and TV shows online, causing significant losses to production studios. George Bridi, 52, pleaded a conspiracy charge for copyright infringement during a telephone hearing before U.S. District Judge Richard Berman in Manhattan.

Football: Leeds owner Kim Kardashian and Radrizzani help 130 Afghan players fly to Britain

Reality TV star Kim Kardashian and Leeds United football club owner Andrea Radrizzani helped former Afghan captain Khalida Popal transport 130 Afghan footballers and their families from Pakistan to Britain on Thursday. Popal, based in Copenhagen, led efforts to evacuate female athletes from Afghanistan after the Taliban took control of the country in August.

Time’s Up advocacy group must be “rebuilt” after missteps discovered

Time’s Up, the group founded in Hollywood nearly four years ago amid an outcry over sexual harassment, said on Friday it would undergo a “major reset” after a report revealed confusion over its mission, poor communication and other missteps. The group, created with big-name stars and a lot of fanfare in January 2018, gave employees no clear direction on their work and was seen as too close to Hollywood and Democratic politicians, according to an outside consultant’s report. . Time’s Up commissioned the study following public criticism.

Cuban protest anthem “Patria y Vida” wins Latin Grammy Song of the Year award

A group of Cuban musicians, including reggaeton duo Gente de Zona, won Song of the Year at the 2021 Latin Grammy Awards on Thursday for “Patria y Vida,” a provocative hip-hop song that has become the movement’s anthem. of Cuba’s anti-government protest. Gente de Zona, Yotuel from hip-hop group Orishas and singer-songwriter Descemer Bueno collaborated on the song with two rappers in Cuba, Maykel Osorbo and El Funky, who are part of a collective of dissident artists. on the communist island.

“Emotionally Brilliant”: Singer Adele Releases New Album “30”

Music star Adele released her first album in six years on Friday, winning over critics and fans with the record she said she made to explain her divorce to her young son. The highly anticipated “30” is the Briton’s fourth studio album, whose chart-topping ballads of breakups, regrets and nostalgia have made her one of the most successful singer-songwriter of all. the temperature.

(This story was not edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)


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Madison VanDenburg to make Holiday Parade debut – The Daily Gazette https://steveazarlive.com/madison-vandenburg-to-make-holiday-parade-debut-the-daily-gazette/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 01:40:25 +0000 https://steveazarlive.com/madison-vandenburg-to-make-holiday-parade-debut-the-daily-gazette/ The Schenectady Holiday Parade is a long-standing family tradition for musician Madison VanDenburg. As a child, the Cohoes native and “American Idol” Season 17 finalist competed in the parade with a contingent from the Capital District Soap Box Derby, occasionally singing Christmas carols on the group’s float. On Saturday, she will debut “The Light of […]]]>

The Schenectady Holiday Parade is a long-standing family tradition for musician Madison VanDenburg.

As a child, the Cohoes native and “American Idol” Season 17 finalist competed in the parade with a contingent from the Capital District Soap Box Derby, occasionally singing Christmas carols on the group’s float.

On Saturday, she will debut “The Light of Christmas,” a song written by multi-platinum songwriters Kenny Lamb and Anthony Little, at the Schenectady Tree Lighting and Holiday Parade.

“The circle is complete,” VanDenburg said in a recent interview with The Gazette.

She recorded the heartwarming song in Nashville with Lamb.

“When I heard Madison sing on ‘Idol,’ it wasn’t her range or her power that caught my attention, it was the way she emotionally connected to the songs and the lyrics – that intangible thing that we are looking for and can’t explain, but you know it when you hear it, ”Lamb said in a statement.

While VanDenburg had initially gone to Nashville to record other songs, as soon as Lamb sent her a demo of “The Light of Christmas,” she immediately logged on.

“For me, ‘The Light of Christmas’ is about the feeling of unity around the holidays and the joy that Christmas brings. Around Christmas, the world seems so much lighter and happier, especially when you are with your loved ones. There is no other feeling like Christmas, ”VanDenburg said.

The song precedes several others she has worked on over the past year. At the start of the pandemic, VanDenburg had a strong show schedule, but had to cancel them and focus on songwriting.

“As difficult as it was in many aspects… there were some things that were pretty good to be able to be home and really keep my head down and work, because I really felt like I was more connected. with the composing side of music, ”VanDenburg said.

“It gave me the time to really look inside and understand who I was as an artist.”

During her career, VanDenburg has performed songs of various genres, from pop to singer / songwriter to country.

“I think because I love all music and I love all kinds of genres, for years it was so hard to perfect, but I’m really comfortable presenting myself more as a pop artist. she said, adding that the music she writes and enjoys the most is her vocals and strong lyrics, such as the work of pop artists Halsey and Demi Lovato.

“This is the direction I’m heading and I really like it. I’m very excited to show this new side of me, ”said VanDenburg.

In the coming weeks, she will also have a performance in Chicago for the city’s Thanksgiving Parade. But the launch of “The Light of Christmas” in the capital region was important for VanDenburg.

“The Capital Region has always been so patient with me and supports and encourages me. It’s something I’m so grateful for, and that’s why I’m so excited to debut the song at the parade. They can see it live before anyone else, ”said VanDenburg.

Kick-off of the season

With its return in 2021, the 52nd Schenectady Holiday Parade will celebrate superheroes on and off the big screen.

“After a year off, we wanted to honor the hard work of all the doctors, nurses and frontline workers since the start of 2020, but we also look forward to getting together this holiday season,” said Kaci Palleschi, event coordinator for the parade’s main sponsor, the Daily Gazette. “We will honor the ‘super’ of all of our heroes, including childhood comic book characters and our everyday heroes.

Starting Saturday at 5 pm, the parade is expected to draw more than 15,000 people to downtown Schenectady.

It will include 18 tanks, some with designs inspired by superheroes. CREATE Community Studios’ tank will feature 20 superheroes with unique imaginations, created primarily by young artists and ranging from alien creatures to anime-style humans.

Mountain Ridge Adventures will have a Spider-Man themed chariot, and while they may not be categorized as superheroes, the Princesses of Hill City Ice Queen will be present, making their way along the route of the parade in a horse-drawn carriage.

“We have some impressive tanks to look forward to this year. Several entries will honor our frontline workers as superheroes, ”said Palleschi.

One of those frontline workers, Rodelin “Rodel” Sumiran, a full-time nurse in the intensive care unit at Ellis Hospital, will serve as the parade’s grand marshal. He was voted Nurse of the Year 2021 by Daily Gazette readers and is an assistant instructor for the Ellis Medicine-Belanger School of Nursing. At a press conference earlier this season, Sumiran said the holiday parade has become an annual tradition since his family migrated from the Philippines to Schenectady seven years ago.

“Each year we looked forward to it,” he said. “It was something that was initially new, but as we have stayed here and it has become our home, we are looking forward to it. It’s actually the best way to start the vacation.

The parade will begin at SUNY Schenectady County Community College, move up State Street and end at Lafayette Street. Attendees may notice additional holiday decor along the way, as the city added more wreaths and lighted trees to State Street and encouraged businesses to decorate their storefronts with holiday decorations.

The added decor is part of a competition known as “Illuminocity,” in which businesses partner with nonprofits. Companies will compete for first places in the following categories: creative design; pride of Schenectady; technical challenge; the most lively; and the Griswolds. The Daily Gazette will also host online voting for a People’s Choice category between November 19 and January 3.

Cash prizes will be awarded to the first, second and third place winners, with the public’s choice having only one winner. The prizes will then be given to the non-profit association associated with each company.

For more information, visit Downtownschenectady.org.

More from The Daily Gazette:

Categories: Entertainment, Life and Arts


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Cellist Cole Randolph talks about breaking racial barriers as a classical musician https://steveazarlive.com/cellist-cole-randolph-talks-about-breaking-racial-barriers-as-a-classical-musician/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 05:04:17 +0000 https://steveazarlive.com/cellist-cole-randolph-talks-about-breaking-racial-barriers-as-a-classical-musician/ On June 4, the Scarab Club opened its outdoor garden to present a string duo, showcasing Velda Kelly’s talents on the violin and Cole Randolph on the cello. The day’s program included a brief article on how Randolph got involved in music and his journey. The 24-year-old was born in Washington, DC, and joined the […]]]>

On June 4, the Scarab Club opened its outdoor garden to present a string duo, showcasing Velda Kelly’s talents on the violin and Cole Randolph on the cello. The day’s program included a brief article on how Randolph got involved in music and his journey. The 24-year-old was born in Washington, DC, and joined the Detroit Symphony Orchestra in 2020 as an African American Orchestra Fellow, after graduating from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in Mathematics, Music (Performance) and Economics.

In a city best known for making Grammy-winning rappers and Motown legends, Randolph feels like he’s standing out as an African-American classical musician in Detroit. Model D reporter Zaire Daniels sat down with him to ask him questions about his experience breaking down barriers.

Zaire Daniels: So how did you get interested in classical music?

Cole Randolph: Growing up, my dad was a musician and songwriter. My older sister and my brother decided to play the violin. So when my mom gave birth to me and my twin sister, my dad said, in order to realize this vision of having a family string quartet, I played the cello and then my twin sister played the alto. So we have finished the Quartet.

We rehearsed in our living room closest to the street. People were always like, oh, wow, the music is so beautiful and then we would go out and they were kind of shocked, like unicorns had just come out, because that wasn’t an expected thing for four little black kids. coming out, playing classical music at a high level.

ZD: So what’s it like to be a black cellist?

CR: I started playing the cello at 5 years old and the hardest part wasn’t training. Then the hardest part was that you didn’t have anyone to admire. I didn’t really understand it, because I was young. But I love to play basketball with my brother. We could still go on YouTube and watch Allen Iverson clips, you know, Lebron James clips, whatever. When it comes to classical music, there was no one I could really admire except my dad, because he’s the only person I really know in terms of classical music. I considered myself more of a cellist than a black cellist, but when I got older and continued to play the cello, I would always watch and there were some very high level players who were white and Asian, you could always count on that, but blacks you could hardly find.

If we as black classical musicians needed inspiration, you know, there are a lot of mainstream African American rappers, singers, and songwriters. When it comes to classical music, there was no one in my culture that I could really admire.

ZD: What was it like studying cello at university?

CR: Well, my last year of high school, I kind of moved away from basketball. I had been playing since grade one and got offers at small D one and D two schools, but I knew it wasn’t something I really wanted to do with my life. I wasn’t thinking about ‘what have I been called to do? Why am I on this earth? ‘ I’m like ‘what will attract me girls, what will make me the most popular?’

My parents would tell me, “Oh, you should audition for this music school in Wisconsin,” but I didn’t play the cello much in high school. The teacher asked me to audition in person and, to be honest with you, it wasn’t at all the level it should have been. We talked about my life and my childhood and he asked if my parents were in Wisconsin. I was like, why are you going to embarrass me in front of my parents and tell them that I was not successful. He brought them in, and then to make a long story short he said, “What Cole has in terms of emotion and expressiveness in his playing, that can’t be taught, but the technical facilities he needs can. be taught and I can teach him, but he just has to promise we’ll work hard in the studio.

I mean, even going black again, like maybe I was one of the three at most, including myself in school. Wisconsin University was only 2% black out of 50,000 people. You know, growing up in Washington DC, very diverse all the way to Wisconsin and often in school within the school, being the music school, walking around the room you notice things like, everybody. world dresses differently from me, everyone is just different. I was like, I don’t really like it. Also, I felt like I was always catching up in terms of music and it didn’t do me good to be a minority student.

ZD: Now you said you majored in math and economics? How did you manage to keep it all together?

CR: First year, I knew I was making music to make my parents happy. I was just sitting in my academic classes, getting good grades, and then going back to music school and feeling kind of catching up. I made up a bs excuse to my teacher like, Oh, you know the music program won’t fit into my academic program next year. So I stopped playing the cello for a year and a half and decided to focus on math and economics. The following summer, I applied for internships on Wall Street and ended up getting an internship in sales and trading.

Once I got this offer I knew I was going to be secure financially, work hard, do whatever I had to do to make that money, but there was some sort of strength or something like that. Personally, I felt like it was God telling me to go back to the cello.

So I ignored it at first, then closer to the second semester of school, I continued to feel it. I emailed my teacher asking if I could take classes and he gave me hard work the whole semester. He told me if you were going to be in the studio you weren’t there to look cute and go out and tell people Oh, I’m playing the cello. I said to myself if I could play the movement of this concerto very well, that is to say like, the music goes on, I hit all the notes, it’s not just mechanical sound so I’ll go put all of them my eggs in the music basket.

So I played well and the next day I called the firm in New York and told them that I wasn’t coming that summer for the internship. My friends thought I was crazy because even then I was still the last president of the orchestra and my musical career was going to be difficult.

I continued to take math classes, continued to take economics classes, and went all-in on the cello. I did it for myself because I knew my parents weren’t telling me to do it, I wasn’t doing it to earn bonus points in bars. Anyway, it was actually my passion. I must have had tunnel vision. And I just kept working and I thank God that everything went well.

ZD: How do you think we can make the arts more accessible to Blacks and Maroons?

CR: I personally think that classical music is accessible. And it can be a hot thing, but I think it’s accessible, maybe not in terms of finances, especially in terms of strings, because there were friends that I had growing up who were very good at the cello, but had to quit because their parents couldn’t afford it.
You have to have the instruments, you have to make sure that there is an interview done on the instrument, so private lessons are expensive if you want a good teacher.

So one thing I think about is relativity rather than accessibility, I can inspire people with my presence but it’s really not enough for me. What I’m doing right now is doing cello covers of popular songs that I post to my Instagram every week. So one example I did was a solo “Cello Sonata” which I then paired with Chief Keefs “Love Sosa”.

The majority of African Americans don’t listen to classical music in their spare time, but by mixing and adding these beats, I can be a top classical musician, while also presenting this art to people who might not be. interested in classical music at first. Seeing someone who looks like you playing classical music at a high level
and knowing that I identify with this music can be a game-changer and get more people involved in the arts.


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10 Beatles Guitar Lessons You Can Learn From John Lennon And George Harrison During The Beatlemania Era https://steveazarlive.com/10-beatles-guitar-lessons-you-can-learn-from-john-lennon-and-george-harrison-during-the-beatlemania-era/ https://steveazarlive.com/10-beatles-guitar-lessons-you-can-learn-from-john-lennon-and-george-harrison-during-the-beatlemania-era/#respond Mon, 08 Nov 2021 19:05:43 +0000 https://steveazarlive.com/10-beatles-guitar-lessons-you-can-learn-from-john-lennon-and-george-harrison-during-the-beatlemania-era/ Guitar lessons: Before the studio experimentation fueled by chemicals from their psychedelic ‘middle’ period, The Beatles were a remarkably well-established success machine. Their live studio performances were tight, and their songwriting chops even tighter – they released hits with remarkable sophistication for songwriters in their early twenties, with a work ethic that puts bands to […]]]>

Guitar lessons: Before the studio experimentation fueled by chemicals from their psychedelic ‘middle’ period, The Beatles were a remarkably well-established success machine.

Their live studio performances were tight, and their songwriting chops even tighter – they released hits with remarkable sophistication for songwriters in their early twenties, with a work ethic that puts bands to shame. modern.


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American middle-class musicians are worth fighting for https://steveazarlive.com/american-middle-class-musicians-are-worth-fighting-for/ https://steveazarlive.com/american-middle-class-musicians-are-worth-fighting-for/#respond Sat, 06 Nov 2021 21:00:17 +0000 https://steveazarlive.com/american-middle-class-musicians-are-worth-fighting-for/ The Irish tell the story of a man who arrives at the gates of heaven asking to enter, and Saint Peter says: “Of course! Just show us your scars. The man says: “But… I have no scars”, and Saint Peter answers: “What a pity. Was there nothing worth fighting for? We musicians are used to […]]]>

The Irish tell the story of a man who arrives at the gates of heaven asking to enter, and Saint Peter says: “Of course! Just show us your scars. The man says: “But… I have no scars”, and Saint Peter answers: “What a pity. Was there nothing worth fighting for?

We musicians are used to fighting. For our livelihoods, our families, our dreams. In recent years, we have fought battles that we neither sought nor provoked against powerful corporate forces that devalue the value of music. The streaming companies, music pirates and AM / FM broadcasters in the United States pay nothing – zero – to artists for radio broadcasting.

It’s shocking, but true: the United States is the only democratic country in the world where artists are not paid to appear on the radio. Only Iran, North Korea and China support the United States in this regard.

Broadcasters make billions of dollars every year from our music, and artists don’t make a dime. This has an impact not only on the artist, but also on session musicians, sound engineers, songwriters. Most everyone in the music business.

Isn’t being paid fairly for your work a core American value?

In recent years, I have met with members of Congress about the rocky economic landscape in which musicians operate. Each meeting has been memorable and meaningful, but one in particular has stayed with me.

I was explaining to a congressman how these issues don’t just affect the strong bank accounts of superstars, they affect musicians like me. Musicians who, like other Americans, have families, mortgages and health insurance to pay. He leaned over in amazement and said, “Wow… you have a mortgage. “

Before I could make up for the sudden awkwardness, he spoke again and quite sincerely. “Forgive me how naive I just sounded, but we don’t hear this sentiment often enough about musicians. He continued, “Every day in Congress we trumpet the plight of the middle class, and yet you are sitting here: a middle class musician demanding grassroots fairness.” It was an emotional moment – and in truth – I choked on it. It was striking to see him “have it” in real time, and I thought I was brave that he said it.

So he’s right: I’m a middle-class American musician. And maybe we don’t hear musicians described in this way often enough. But we should.

I have been a professional musician since the age of 13. I am a recording artist, songwriter, performer, multi-instrumentalist, sound engineer and record producer. I can claim an accomplished career. But surely no one would claim that I am a “star”.

Few musicians are. Just like in other professions, the vast majority of music professionals are middle class and the downward economic pressures we face affect us disproportionately.

But now there is hope.

After years of popular organization and growing political will, a bipartisan group in Congress introduced the U.S. Music Fairness Act. This bill, supported by both Republicans and Democrats, even in this polarized political environment, would close the loophole that has allowed terrestrial broadcasters to go nearly a century without paying artists. No stroke of the pencil could affect more middle-class American musicians.

In addition, passing the bill would bring billions of dollars back to the US economy: because we don’t pay international artists for radio waves here in the US, other democratic countries no longer pay artists. Americans in their countries. The bill would end this de facto embargo.

Broadcasters argue that radio royalties are unnecessary because they give artists “exposure”. Musicians cannot pay their electricity bills with an exhibition.

Broadcasters sow fear by calling any proposed license a “tax”. It is not a tax. It’s a salary.

Broadcasters claim the bill would kill local radio. But the bill specifically protects small broadcasters: stations with less than $ 1 million in annual revenue would see their annual royalty payments capped at $ 500, or $ 1.37 per day.

Broadcasters say the bill would stifle innovation. American music makers don’t need a lesson in innovation. Rock & Roll is an American innovation. Hip-Hop is an American innovation. Jazz, Blues, Country, Gospel, Bluegrass and so many more are distinct American innovations.

Expect these bogus claims and hijack attempts from billion dollar broadcasting conglomerates, but one truth runs through them all:

Music is one of the things America still makes and the world still wants. The people who make this music should be paid fairly for their work.

It will be a battle, for sure. We’re going to have to fight these lies, and fight for our profession. We are going to have to fight by organizing, educating and defending. We’re going to have to fight for the American Music Fairness Act by putting political pressure on our leaders (you can sign this new petition here: IRespectMusic.org).

We all know Congress acts when real people care enough for them to do it.

The time has come.

The battle is upon us. It’s a victory that middle-class American musicians can earn.

And years from now, if anyone asks us how we got our well-deserved scars, we’ll say, “Something worth fighting for.” “

Blake Morgan is a singer-songwriter, music producer and activist.


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House Democrats seek votes to pass Biden’s national platform https://steveazarlive.com/house-democrats-seek-votes-to-pass-bidens-national-platform/ https://steveazarlive.com/house-democrats-seek-votes-to-pass-bidens-national-platform/#respond Fri, 05 Nov 2021 15:23:00 +0000 https://steveazarlive.com/house-democrats-seek-votes-to-pass-bidens-national-platform/ With Republicans unanimously opposed, Democrats are pushing social policy and climate action through Congress through a special process known as reconciliation that shields budget legislation from obstruction and allows it to pass a simple majority. . But Democrats need the votes of each of their senators to pass the bill. This means that senators are […]]]>

With Republicans unanimously opposed, Democrats are pushing social policy and climate action through Congress through a special process known as reconciliation that shields budget legislation from obstruction and allows it to pass a simple majority. . But Democrats need the votes of each of their senators to pass the bill.

This means that senators are likely to amend the social policy bill, which has heightened concerns in the House. Ms Pelosi had promised swing-district Democrats that she would not get them to vote for politically difficult provisions that would not pass the Senate; but on Thursday she was asking them to do just that. Immigration measures are likely to be changed or removed altogether after the Senate parliamentarian, who enforces strict reconciliation rules, rejects much broader proposals for a path to citizenship.

Supporters of the measures demanded their inclusion.

“We’ll cross that bridge when we get there,” said Representative Jimmy Gomez, Democrat of California, of the fate of Senate immigration measures. “The important thing is that they are in it when they leave” the house.

Then there was the question of understanding what was in the bill. In a letter this week, five Democrats – including Reps Stephanie Murphy of Florida and Jared Golden of Maine, as well as Mr Gottheimer – urged Ms Pelosi to give them at least 72 hours to review the text of the policy bill. social and wait for a full congressional marker analysis confirming that the bill has been fully paid.

“What I would like to do is be a reasonable legislator and understand the full context of the bill, as well as how much it is going to cost taxpayers,” Murphy said Thursday.

She told reporters negotiators were still reviewing the immigration provision, a plan to lower the cost of prescription drugs and a push led by Democrats in the Northeast to raise a cap of 10 $ 000 on the amount people can deduct in state and local taxes. On Thursday night, a 10-year $ 72,500 deduction cap that lawmakers believed had been accepted was changed to $ 80,000 over nine years, with a supposed return to $ 10,000 in the 10th year, apparently bringing in $ 14 billion. dollars for the bottom line of the bill.

The joint tax committee on Thursday published his report estimating that the tax increases provided for in the bill would bring in about $ 1.5 trillion over a decade. But a separate non-partisan agency, the Congressional Budget Office, had yet to release a formal analysis of how much the bill would spend or of the revenue generated by other proposals, including a plan to reduce the cost of prescription drugs and to strengthen the IRS’s ability to collect unpaid taxes.


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Greenberg Traurig’s Entertainment and Media Practice Congratulates American Music Awards Nominees https://steveazarlive.com/greenberg-traurigs-entertainment-and-media-practice-congratulates-american-music-awards-nominees/ https://steveazarlive.com/greenberg-traurigs-entertainment-and-media-practice-congratulates-american-music-awards-nominees/#respond Mon, 01 Nov 2021 23:00:00 +0000 https://steveazarlive.com/greenberg-traurigs-entertainment-and-media-practice-congratulates-american-music-awards-nominees/ Greenberg Traurig, LLP’s Entertainment & Media Practice congratulates its clients on their nominations for the upcoming American Music Awards (AMA), which will be held on November 21, 2021. ATLANTA, November 1, 2021 / PRNewswire-PRWeb / – Greenberg Traurig, LLP Entertainment and media practice congratulates its clients on their appointments to the next American Music Prize […]]]>

Greenberg Traurig, LLP’s Entertainment & Media Practice congratulates its clients on their nominations for the upcoming American Music Awards (AMA), which will be held on November 21, 2021.

ATLANTA, November 1, 2021 / PRNewswire-PRWeb / – Greenberg Traurig, LLP Entertainment and media practice congratulates its clients on their appointments to the next American Music Prize (AMA), to hold 21 November, 2021.

“We are delighted to congratulate our clients on their appointments. It is an honor to represent these talented artists who so deserve this important recognition ”, declared Jess rosen, co-chair of Atlanta Entertainment & Media Practice, which, along with Entertainment & Media shareholder Jonathan Koby, represents the nominated artists and songwriters. “Greenberg Traurig is fortunate to have one of the nation’s largest entertainment practices at the forefront of the music industry. With decades of experience, high profile relationships and relationships of long in the entertainment and music industries, we have access to resources critical to the success of our clients. “

Greenberg Traurig customers were awarded with 7 nominations in the following categories:

Kacey musgraves

Dan + Shay

Florida Georgia Line

Lady A

Former Domination

Lee Brice “Hey World”

Chris Young & Kane Brown “Famous Friends”

Featured in Billboard Magazine as one of the top “Nashville Country Power Players,” Rosen has been providing legal advice for over four decades to the biggest names in the country music industry, including the majority of the clients listed below. above, guiding songwriters, producers, recording artists, actors, writers and executives in critical career decisions.

According to its website, WADA nominees are determined by their performance on the Billboard Charts and are not chosen by a voting committee or membership organization. The AMA nominees are based on key fan interactions with music (including streaming, album sales, song sales, radio broadcasting and social engagement) tracked by Billboard and its partner of MRC Data. The AMA winners are elected entirely by the fans. Winners will be announced 21 November during WADA’s live broadcast at 8 p.m. EST on ABC television.

About Greenberg Traurig’s Entertainment and Media Practice: With offices located in centers of the entertainment industry, Greenberg Traurig has established an experienced multidisciplinary international practice in the entertainment and media field. The Greenberg Traurig Entertainment & Media practice focuses on the music, film, television, sports, internet, digital media, publishing and theater industries. The team has access to key players in the entertainment industry and provides its clients with the dedicated legal advice necessary to thrive in today’s multidisciplinary multimedia entertainment market. Its entertainment and media lawyers have consistently been ranked by Hollywood Reporter Power Lawyers, Variety’s Dealmakers Impact Report and Legal Impact Report, Billboard Power Lawyers, Top Lawyers in America, Chambers United States Guide and Super Lawyers.

About Greenberg Traurig, LLP: Greenberg Traurig, LLP (GT) has approximately 2,300 lawyers in 40 locations in United States, Latin America, Europe, Asia, and the Middle East. GT has been recognized for its philanthropic giving, diversity and innovation, and is consistently listed as one of the largest firms in the United States on Law360 400 and among the Top 25 on the Am Law Global 100. The firm is net carbon neutral in regarding its energy consumption in the office and Mansfield Rule 4.0 Plus certified. The Web: http://www.gtlaw.com

Media contact

Lourdes Brezo Martinez, Greenberg Traurig, LLP, 2128012131, martinezl@gtlaw.com

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SOURCE Greenberg Traurig, LLP



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